Friday, January 15, 2010

What is the most important information I should know about green tea?


Pronunciation:GREEN TEE
What is the most important information I should know about green tea?

Green tea has not been evaluated by the FDA for safety, effectiveness, or purity. All potential risks and/or advantages of green tea may not be known. Additionally, there are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for these compounds. There have been instances where herbal/health supplements have been sold which were contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

What is green tea?

The use of green tea in cultural and traditional settings may differ from concepts accepted by current Western medicine. When considering the use of herbal supplements, consultation with a primary health care professional is advisable. Additionally, consultation with a practitioner trained in the uses of herbal/health supplements may be beneficial, and coordination of treatment among all health care providers involved may be advantageous.

Green tea is also known as Camellia sinensis.

Green tea has been used for stomach disorders, vomiting, diarrhea, to prevent dental cavities, to lower cholesterol levels, as an antioxidant, to reduce cancer, and as a stimulant.

Green tea has not been evaluated by the FDA for safety, effectiveness, or purity. All potential risks and/or advantages of green tea may not be known. Additionally, there are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for these compounds. There have been instances where herbal/health supplements have been sold which were contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Green tea may also have uses other than those listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before using green tea?
donot Do not use green tea without first talking to your doctor if you have
  • heart problems or high blood pressure,
  • kidney disease,
  • an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism),
  • an anxiety or nervous disorder, or
  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder or if you take a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

Green tea contains a large amount of caffeine and may be problematic if used by people with any of the conditions listed above. You may not be able to use green tea, or your doctor or health care provider may recommend a lower dose or special monitoring.

Before taking green tea, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care professional if you have allergies (especially to plants), have any medical condition, or if you take other medicines or other herbal/health supplements. Green tea may not be recommended in some situations.

nopreg Do not take green tea without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant. Green tea contains a large amount of caffeine.
nobrfeed Do not take green tea without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Green tea contains a large amount of caffeine, which may cause restlessness, sleep disorders, and other effects in breast-feeding infants.

There is no information available regarding the use of green tea by children. Green tea contains a large amount of caffeine, which may cause anemia and other problems in children. Do not give any herbal/health supplement to a child without first talking to the child's doctor.

How should I take green tea?

The use of green tea in cultural and traditional settings may differ from concepts accepted by current Western medicine. When considering the use of herbal supplements, consultation with a primary health care professional is advisable. Additionally, consultation with a practitioner trained in the uses of herbal/health supplements may be beneficial, and coordination of treatment among all health care providers involved may be advantageous.

If you choose to take green tea, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Standardized formulations of herbal/health supplements may provide a more reliable dose of the product.

Store green tea as directed on the package. In general, green tea should be protected from light and moisture.

What happens if I miss a dose?

No information is available regarding a missed dose of green tea. Consult your doctor, pharmacist, or health care professional if you require further information.

What happens if I overdose?
emt Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a green tea overdose are not well known but might include restlessness, tremor, vomiting, and abdominal spasms.

What should I avoid while taking green tea?

The amount of caffeine consumed in other products should be monitored while taking green tea.

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while taking green tea, unless otherwise directed by your health care provider.

What are the possible side effects of green tea?
emt Although rare, allergic reactions to green tea may occur. Stop taking green tea and seek emergency medical attention if you experience symptoms of a serious allergic reaction including difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives.

Heavy and prolonged consumption of green tea may be associated with esophageal cancer.

Other less serious side effects have also been reported with the use of green tea. Talk to your doctor or health care provider if you experience

  • heartburn;
  • upset stomach;
  • loss of appetite;
  • constipation or diarrhea;
  • nervousness, irritability, or anxiety;
  • sleeplessness;
  • irregular heartbeats; or
  • headache.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect green tea?
donot Do not use green tea without first talking to your doctor if you are taking a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

Interactions between green tea and other prescription or over-the-counter medicines or herbal/health supplements may also occur. Talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care professional before taking green tea if you are taking any other medicines or supplements.

Where can I get more information?

Your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider may have more information about green tea.



Consultation with a licensed health care professional is advisable before using any herbal/health supplement. Additionally, consultation with a practitioner trained in the uses of herbal/health supplements may be beneficial and coordination of treatment among all health care providers involved may be advantageous. Remember, keep this and all other prescription drug products, over-the-counter drug products, and herbal/health supplements out of the reach of children.

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Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Couch potatoes beware, TV can kill

People Who Spend More Than 4 Hours A Day Watching TV Are At 46% Higher Risk Of Death: Oz Study


Sydney: People who spend more than four hours in front of the television each day have a far higher risk of dying early than those who limit their viewing, an Australian study said Tuesday. 
    Researchers from the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in the state of Victoria tracked the lifestyle habits of 8,800 adults and found that each hour spent in front of the TV daily increased the risk of dying earlier from cardiovascular disease. 
    The study, published in 'Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association', found every hour in front of the TV was associated with an 11% in
creased risk of death from all causes, a 9% higher risk of cancer death, and an 18% increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) related death. 
    "Compared with people who watched less than two hours of television daily, those who watched more than four hours a day had a 46% higher risk of death from all causes and an 80% increased risk for CVD-related death," the researchers said in a statement. The researchers said this association held regardless of other independent and common cardiovascular disease risk factors, including smoking, high blood pressure, high blood cho
lesterol, unhealthy diet, excessive waist circumference, and leisure-time exercises. 
    Researcher David Dunstan said the study focused specifically on television watching but the findings suggest that any prolonged sedentary behaviour, such as sitting at a desk or in front of a computer, may pose a health risk. "The human body was designed to move, not sit for extended periods of time," said Dunstan, head of the institute's physical activity laboratory in the division of metabolism and obesity. 
    "Technological, social, and economic changes mean that people don't move their muscles 
as much as they used to — consequently the levels of energy expenditure as people go about their lives continue to shrink. 
    "For many people, on a daily basis they simply shift from one chair to another — from the chair in the car to the chair in the office to the chair in front of the television." 
    Dunstan said the findings applied not only to individuals who were overweight and obese, but also those of a healthy weight. "Even if someone has a healthy body weight, sitting for long periods of time still has an unhealthy influence on their blood sugar and blood fats," he said. REUTERS

SMALL SCREEN, BIG RISK? The findings apply not only to individuals who are overweight and obese, but also to those with healthy weight